Triangular Light Dispersion Glass Prisms

Triangular Glass Prisms

Great for science lab demonstrations, experiments or custom promotional gift items

Glass Prisms

Indigo™ triangular glass prisms for white light dispersion and retroreflection.

Use for science lab demonstrations experiments or unique custom imprinted promotional gift items.

Understanding the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum is a fundamental requirement of the basic sciences. This applies to physics & the spectroscopic analysis of stars, chemical reactions & the biology of photosynthesis & vision.

Sir Isaac Newton first demonstrated the dispersion of sunlight into the familiar rainbow component colors of violet, blue, green, yellow, orange and red using a triangular/equilateral glass prism. Glass prisms are better suited than acrylic prisms for experiments because of their higher refractive index for shorter wavelength blue light to longer wavelength red light.

Displaying 1 to 6 (of 6 products)
White Light Glass Prism Refraction Set

White Light Glass Prism Refraction Set

SKU: 44750-4P
$25.95USD Each
50mm Equilateral White Light Glass Prism

50mm Equilateral White Light Glass Prism

SKU: 44751
$4.25USD or lower Each
75mm Equilateral Glass Refraction Prism

75mm Equilateral Glass Refraction Prism

SKU: 44753
$5.75USD or lower Each
100mm Equilateral White Light Glass Prism

100mm Equilateral White Light Glass Prism

SKU: 44754
$6.75USD or lower Each
150mm White Light Glass Dispersion Prism

150mm White Light Glass Dispersion Prism

SKU: 44756
$8.25USD or lower Each
Right Angle Glass Retroreflector Prism

Right Angle Glass Retroreflector Prism

SKU: 44752
$5.95USD or lower Each
More Information

Check out this chandelier made with special 225mm (9") equilateral glass prisms. The variety of different incident light angles makes for a stunning entrance. Thanks to Fabray Lighting Design, Comstock Design, TableM, and AdLight for sharing this image & allowing us to show it.

Glass Prism Chandelier

Technical

In addition to prisms, a glass stirring rod can demonstrate how refractive index influences the path of a light ray as it moves from one medium, air, to another, water.