Test Tube Sculptures: Lab Series “Sliced”

Our customers buy glass test tubes for an impressive range of craft projects, most of which have little to do with science. The images shown below are another matter entirely and are perhaps one of the most unusual blends of art and science. The work speaks for itself but where it doesn’t, we use the artist’s or gallery’s own words.

Test Tube Art “Sliced”

In Cindy’s own words:

SLICED  consists of a series of cut-up vintage anatomical transparencies. Each unique set represents a stage or process in the dissection process. Isolated in dangling test tubes, images of the dissected human eye are divided into reduced, yet still recognizable, sections. The blank physical spaces in-between the test tubes allow for mental reflection and emotional/ethical contemplation about scientific methods and applications.

Test tube art
Image of dissected human eye.
More test tube art
Different perspective on dissected human eye.
Close up of some of the test tubes from image above.

About the Art

Sarah Patterson describes this work on display at the City of Ottawa Art Collection:

“Cindy Stelmackowich believes that visual images can pass on knowledge in science and medicine. In each of her projects she applies techniques used in medical dissection: cutting, splicing, isolating and preserving individual organs and body parts. Inspired by vintage microscopic slides and anatomical charts, SLICED is made up of images of the human eye taken from a 1920s student anatomy textbook.
The images are each represent a stage in the dissection process. Stainless steel clips reference laboratory instrumentation.”
For more information on the artist’s work, see:  Between Art and Biomedicine

About the Artist

Cindy Stelmackowich is an Ottawa-based artist, curator and professor. She completed a BA and BFA at the University of Saskatchewan, MA at Carleton University and PhD in History and Theory of Art at Binghamton University (New York).

Stelmackowich is the recipient of the 2009 Mid-Career Artist Award from the Council for the Arts in Ottawa.

Glass Test Tubes for Crafts

The test tubes pictured above are 25x150mm (1×6″) which are slightly larger than the standard 18x150mm (3/4×6″) lab test tubes. We have both smaller and larger ones which can hold anything from small notes up to coffee and vanilla beans. A 50% discount applies when bought in case quantities.

About Stephan Logan

VP Sales & Marketing at Indigo Instruments. Previously sold hi tech science instruments to researchers. B.Sc. & M.Sc. from McGill University.

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